PHOSPHORUS. (ART. EN IDIOMA INGLÉS.)


Phosphorus is transparent, colorless, or pale-yellow. It is extraordinarily reactive: it is odorless and tasteless, unless it is exposed to oxygen, at which time it changes from white to yellow phosphorus, in light it takes on a layer of red phosphorus, in the dark it becomes luminous, and it develops a garlicky smell. It ignites at 120 degrees F (50 degrees C) at which time it burns with a brilliant white flame.
Chemically, phosphorus always combines with other elements, whether it be calcium, magnesium, iron, or numerous others. It is never alone!

Equally reactive are Phosphorus people: hypersensitive to sensory impressions including noise, light, music, odors, and touch. They are also emotionally hypersensitive: they are sympathetic and want and need sympathy from others; they want others around and are fearful of being alone.
Equally reactive are Phosphorus people: hypersensitive to sensory impressions including noise, light, music, odors, and touch. They are also emotionally hypersensitive: they are sympathetic and want and need sympathy from others; they want others around and are fearful of being alone.

Every tissue in the body has some phosphorus in it. The heart has the most by percentage, perhaps explaining the excessive light or joy that Phosphorus people feel, though the skeleton has the greatest amount of phosphorus. Calcium is the only mineral that we require in greater quantities than phosphorus. Physiology texts describe phosphorus as having more widely differing functions than any other element in the body.
Phosphorus is a constituent of many vital organic compounds, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) , a chemical that plays an integral role in releasing stored energy in the cell (B vitamins are only effective when they are combined with phosphate in the body), phospholipids which play a major role in the absorption and metabolism of fats and in the permeability of the plasma membrane, phosphorylation which is a key reaction in many metabolic processes including the uptake of glucose by the cell, and inorganic phosphates which create an important buffer system in maintaining acid-alkaline balance.

Like the mineral phosphorus which is so diffused throughout the human body, it is no accident that one of the primary characteristics of people who need Phosphorus is diffusion--an inability to set limits and to separate self from non-self.
Phosphorus is known for giving off light without heat when exposed to air. Similar to a phosphorescent light, people who benefit from Phosphorus radiate with an extroverted, even effervescent personality. Like a match with a phosphorus tip, they emit light but tend to burn out quickly and become exhausted.

A plant deficient in phosphorus develops a thin, long stem and weak roots. Similarly, people who need Phosphorus tend to be thin and tall, and not psychologically "grounded." They tend to be "spacey," have difficulty finishing projects, and become easily fatigued.

Although phosphorus cannot be detected in the atmosphere, a tropical plant called Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) contains high concentrations of it which are absorbed in a mysterious way. This moss flourishes even when it grows above the ground on telephone wires. Phosphorus people have similarly mysterious powers: they typically have hyperacute senses and not only are they able to see, hear, and feel more than most other people, but they also sometimes are intuitive and can even be clairvoyant.
Phosphorus is widely available in foods, especially in sodas and food additives, and a deficiency in it is very rare. The more common problem is excessive intake of this mineral, which can disrupt the delicately balanced chemistry of the body. For instance, too much phosphorus can cause the body to excrete excessive amounts of calcium. Osteoporosis is more commonly the result of ingesting too much phosphorus, protein, or fat, all of which lead to the excretion of calcium, than it is to taking too little calcium.

On the other hand, depletion of phosphorus in the body occurs from alcoholism, overuse of antacids or barbiturates, intravenous glucose, and a vitamin D deficiency. When a person become phosphorus-deficient, he develops muscular weakness, anemia, and increased susceptibility to infection.
If a person needs Phosphorus , it is useful to assess if there are any factors in his or her life that is creating an overdosing of phosphorus or a phosphorus-deficiency. Hahnemann implored homeopaths to remove the obstacle to cure in order to attain and maintain good health. Such simple advice is important, or homeopaths will suffer from the same critique that is given conventional doctors who only push pills and don't seek to involve the patient in his or her own health.